Tech.Revolution https://www.techrevolution.asia Sat, 19 Aug 2017 06:00:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.1 Top five mobile threats to your enterprise data https://www.techrevolution.asia/top-five-mobile-threats-enterprise-data/ https://www.techrevolution.asia/top-five-mobile-threats-enterprise-data/#respond Sat, 19 Aug 2017 06:00:13 +0000 https://www.techrevolution.asia/?p=13416 Written by: Phil Muncaster Mobile devices are near-ubiquitous productivity tools for enterprise employees, but they are also vulnerable to malicious third parties. Hackers want to take advantage of the security gaps that don’t exist on desktop PCs – and we reveal how to outsmart them. By 2020, 60 per cent of the world will access the...

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Written by: Phil Muncaster

Mobile devices are near-ubiquitous productivity tools for enterprise employees, but they are also vulnerable to malicious third parties. Hackers want to take advantage of the security gaps that don’t exist on desktop PCs – and we reveal how to outsmart them.

By 2020, 60 per cent of the world will access the internet via their mobile devices, according to a GSMA Intelligence report. Thanks to the rise of BYOD, mobile devices have become an essential workplace tool around the world. Nearly three-quarters of enterprises allow some employees to use their personal device in the workplace, and it’s widely believed that doing so increases staff productivity and mobility, and keeps employees happier in their roles.

With so many benefits, why wouldn’t you support mobile working?

 

Hackers on the prowl

In recent years, mobile devices have been increasingly targeted by hackers who view them as an exploitable weakness in the business world. They want to steal data stored on individual devices or use them as a gateway to sneak into corporate networks undetected. The problems are compounded by the dearth of satisfactory security policies implemented for employee-owned devices – even ones that connect to the network.

The repercussions for organisations could be – and are – severe. Regulatory fines, legal fees and clean-up costs can all stem from data breaches. Not to mention the fallout from reputational damage, which can include lost customers and a fall in share price.

Here are five key threats to watch out for when it comes to spotting potential cybercrime as quickly as possible:

  1. Spear-phishing

Innocuous-looking links and attachments can surreptitiously harbour malware. On mobile devices, the threat comes not only from unsolicited emails but also SMS.

  1. Kernel exploits

Among the most serious threats, kernel exploits let attackers take complete control of targeted devices remotely.

  1. Malicious apps

One of the most common methods of spreading malware, these legitimate-looking apps are often found on third-party app stores, but sometimes they find their way to official platforms like Google Play and the App Store.

  1. Man-in-the-middle attacks

This attack typically occurs when using unsecured public Wi-Fi. It can let hackers monitor everything you’re doing on your mobile and expose corporate logins. This poses even greater risk when you consider that over one-quarter of UK workers admit to using the same password for personal and corporate accounts.

  1. Rogue base station/access point

Relatively rare compared to the threats listed above, if an attacker successfully installs a rogue base station it could reveal corporate credentials without the user even realising it, especially since mobiles automatically connect.

User education can alleviate many of these threats, but it must be combined with a security policy updated for the mobile age. Consider implementing an enterprise mobile management solution, or even blocking devices from connecting to the network if they aren’t on a pre-approved list.

 

Original article first appeared here

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NASA about to send rocket to nowhere https://www.techrevolution.asia/nasa-send-rocket-nowhere/ https://www.techrevolution.asia/nasa-send-rocket-nowhere/#respond Sat, 19 Aug 2017 02:00:06 +0000 https://www.techrevolution.asia/?p=13453 As every innovator knows, any endeavour requires a goal. But until recently, NASA was spending billions to develop a rocket with no confirmed destination.   In June 2017, a 17-foot-tall rocket motor was launched from the sands of Utah as a test for the 2018 (and beyond) space mission. Orbital ATK was commissioned by NASA...

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As every innovator knows, any endeavour requires a goal. But until recently, NASA was spending billions to develop a rocket with no confirmed destination.

 

In June 2017, a 17-foot-tall rocket motor was launched from the sands of Utah as a test for the 2018 (and beyond) space mission. Orbital ATK was commissioned by NASA to develop the rocket motor as part of the Space Launch System (SLS).

 

But the nagging question on people’s minds has been, where is the costly system headed? Now, six years and billions of dollars later, the highly anticipated rocket finally has a destination.

 

In 2018, the rocket is set to travel to the moon’s orbit, and to explore Europa 4 years later. When the full SLS system launches in 2019, it will carry humans and cargo deep into space to develop what might just become a livable habitat. The launch abort motor is part of a safety plan that will transport space teams away in the event of any future rocket malfunction.

 

The space crews will begin creating a habitat and staging area for long-distance travel through space. The crews will continue developing the deep space infrastructure through 2029, with a crew of 4 living in the moon’s ether for a year to test conditions on equipment and habitation.

 

In the long-term vision, NASA’s astronauts will finally head toward Mars—the planet previously touched only by sci-fi. In the meantime, they’re working with industry giants to develop space capsules capable of withstanding the most gruelling conditions so they can finally take their high-flying dreams into orbit.

 

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Whatever happened to 3D printing? https://www.techrevolution.asia/whatever-happened-3d-printing/ https://www.techrevolution.asia/whatever-happened-3d-printing/#respond Fri, 18 Aug 2017 04:40:02 +0000 https://www.techrevolution.asia/?p=11382 The hype around 3D printing, which was at its peak just three years ago, seems to have fizzled as of late. Headlines predicting its disruptive potential began to fade in 2015 when a number of promising startups failed to take flight. But although the media has mostly moved on, 3D printing is far from dead....

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The hype around 3D printing, which was at its peak just three years ago, seems to have fizzled as of late. Headlines predicting its disruptive potential began to fade in 2015 when a number of promising startups failed to take flight. But although the media has mostly moved on, 3D printing is far from dead.

Despite the market’s slow growth, 3D printing trailblazers are still moving fast with a number of innovations that have the potential to propel this tech to new heights.

 

Emerging New Players

Ambitious companies are buying unprecedented numbers of machines. Engineers are rethinking 3D printing entirely, considering options like using a laser to cure liquid plastic layer-by-layer. New Matter is one young company testing alternate options, experimenting with an unusual design that moves its print bed around on two spinning rods while the print head moves up and down.

Desktop Metal, backed by giants like General Electric and BMW, is striving to reinvent the currently pricey process of how we make metal parts. The goal? To transform the economics of mass-production (think smaller factories and zero need for inventory).

 

Next Wave of Technology

Despite years of stalled progress, 3D printing shouldn’t be written off. The technology could redefine the way we think of manufacturing as a whole, with the cost of production staying the same whether businesses are producing one product or 100.

As the technology rapidly improves, less expensive printers will continue to emerge, and adoption will move toward the ultimate goal of making this tech accessible for all.

 

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Beyond chatbots: The future of AI for marketing and the customer experience https://www.techrevolution.asia/beyond-chatbots-future-ai-marketing-customer-experience/ https://www.techrevolution.asia/beyond-chatbots-future-ai-marketing-customer-experience/#respond Fri, 18 Aug 2017 04:00:35 +0000 https://www.techrevolution.asia/?p=12327 There’s a great deal of current focus on Artificial Intelligence (AI) in technology and business circles. So much so, the interest and attention has branched out into society at large. Little wonder when AI is the stuff of a sci-fi aficionado’s dreams – take George Lucas’s polite C-3PO robot, or my favourite android from Star Trek:...

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There’s a great deal of current focus on Artificial Intelligence (AI) in technology and business circles. So much so, the interest and attention has branched out into society at large.

Little wonder when AI is the stuff of a sci-fi aficionado’s dreams – take George Lucas’s polite C-3PO robot, or my favourite android from Star Trek: The Next Generationaptly named Data, or a hopefully more benevolent Hal, everyone’s favourite sentient computer from 2001: A Space Odyssey.

But if we’re not quite there yet, where are we?

Part of the focus is on AI industry market size predictions, expected to be around US$36 billion by 2025. We also see significant public and private sector R&D investments into machine learning, along with C-level guides on how to position one’s business for an AI future.

For marketing, AI presents increasing opportunities to harness data even more effectively than we’re able to today. But our industry will need to keep the best possible customer experience top of mind.

The key marketing question to ask of AI is: Does this application of artificial intelligence increase relevance and usefulness for the customer?

Our technology landscape is increasingly informed by the opinions and behaviours of millennials and post-millennials (those born after approx. 1995). How they see the roll out of AI in the context of society, business and marketing will be critical.

 

What is AI exactly?

The easiest way to think about artificial intelligence is to visualise computing software that teaches itself how to understand, reason, strategise and act when exposed to the right information.

A PWC guide for C-level execs discusses typical use cases being explored today, defining AI as “software algorithms capable of performing tasks that normally require human intelligence, such as visual perceptionspeech recognitiondecision-making, and language translation.”

These are the AI applications getting much of the attention in research and development today.

Today, we’re able to make bigger steps toward more meaningful AI due to the availability of massive data sets along with the increased computing power to analyse and interpret information.

Despite the buzz on AI developments at major corporations and academic labs that include Stanford University and MIT, machine learning itself is a decades-old idea. In fact, machine learning is just one component of AI.

Today, we’re able to make bigger steps toward more meaningful AI due to the availability of massive data sets along with the increased computing power to analyse and interpret information. This is also the reason machine learning and AI has re-entered the public consciousness.

 

AI meets marketing and the customer experience

Will AI become more integrated with our everyday lives? Yes, and the early steps are visible with the use of personal assistants on our smart devices, signalling something of a generational change. (Lenovo and other tech companies have released smart home products in this space such as the Amazon Alexa powered Lenovo Smart Assistant.)

Millennials and post-millennials (plus a good portion of the rest of us) increasingly expect to use voice recognition daily.

This is only set to continue because that is what we want from our technology. Forty-six per cent of millennials with smart phones use voice recognition software today, and over 70% of voice recognition users are happy with the experience.

In this sense, customers are AI and machine intelligence ready. The impact from AI on how the customer experience is managed will be profound. Gartner estimates that by 2020, 40% of mobile interactions between people and their virtual personal assistants will be powered by the data gathered from users in cloud-based neural networks.

Customers are AI and machine intelligence ready. The impact from AI on how the customer experience is managed will be profound.

Before that, by 2018, digital customer assistants will recognise customers by both face and voice, 20% of all business content will be written by machines, and more than 3 million workers globally will report to a “robo-boss”. I wonder if Arnold Schwarzenegger has been contacted by scriptwriters for another Terminator sequel (or even if he now needs to be)?

 

How will AI and AI-fuelled CX impact marketing?

Customers already expect algorithms to pick up on their preferences and target them with contextually accurate offers. Brand creative, content streams and user platforms have morphed significantly in recent years as new channels have become normalised.

Intelligent chatbots will continue to interact with customers, supported by more sophisticated data analytics platforms on the back-end, capable of absorbing greater amounts of customer data in shorter periods of time. Look no further than what Facebook are doing with up to 30,000 active bots via its Messenger service. Or in Australia, where News Corp’s AI and machine learning engineers created a unique conversational interface: they took the diary entries of Australian soldier Archie Barwick, and programmed them into a bot that answered questions posed by the public.

AI gives brands even clearer views on what customers really want and how they want it.

Marketing automation has been around for a while, but AI gives brands even clearer views on what customers really want and how they want it. It will increase both the relevance and usefulness of marketing, which itself will improve the customer experience.

AI will also make greater sense of the big data that’s being gathered to drive deeper contextual insights into how customers engage.

AI will also make greater sense of the big data that’s being gathered to drive deeper contextual insights into how customers engage. Complex systems and advanced analytics will change the way we experience information via our mobiles, our wearables and the Internet of Things (IoT).

 

What about ethics?

Are there considerations to keep in mind as artificial intelligence is applied to business and society? I believe so.

Society first started considering these issues in 1942 with the introduction of science fiction author Isaac Asimov’s Three Laws of Robotics. And they ring true to this day, covering some of the very questions the self-driving vehicle industry is currently grappling with.

With profound implications, the discussion today has evolved to cover how we want our society to develop. As MIT Media Lab director Joi Ito said in January, “One of the most critical challenges is how do we make sure that the machines we ‘train’ don’t perpetuate and amplify the same human biases that plague society? How can we best initiate a broader, in-depth discussion about how society will co-evolve with this technology, and connect computer science and social sciences to develop intelligent machines that are not only ‘smart,’ but also socially responsible?”

This position coincides with the viewpoints of millennials and post-millennials, and I’m optimistic we’re moving in positive directions in terms of addressing socioeconomic issues. Facebook recently announced technology that can help detect when people with immediate mental health concerns need assistance. And Intel has set up a thought-leadership board to address how society can use AI for the common good.

In summary, while we harness AI to make marketing and CX more positive, efficient and relevant, industry and academic leaders will all need to play a role in developing responsible applications of artificial intelligence.

We’re about to embark on a fascinating new era of interaction between computers and humans.

Exciting times ahead!

I welcome your thoughts and comments. Please tag me below or find me on Twitter.

 

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35 under 35 https://www.techrevolution.asia/35-under-35/ https://www.techrevolution.asia/35-under-35/#respond Thu, 17 Aug 2017 22:00:40 +0000 https://www.techrevolution.asia/?p=13428 There’s no such thing as ageism in technology, as we’ve seen time and again. Thirteen-year-olds founding companies. Seventeen-year-olds becoming CEOs. Innovation is alive and well among Millennials and Gen Z.   MIT Tech Reviews’ annual list of the top 35 under 35 was recently released, giving shout-outs to the latest batch of inventors, visionaries, entrepreneurs,...

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There’s no such thing as ageism in technology, as we’ve seen time and again. Thirteen-year-olds founding companies. Seventeen-year-olds becoming CEOs. Innovation is alive and well among Millennials and Gen Z.

 

MIT Tech Reviews’ annual list of the top 35 under 35 was recently released, giving shout-outs to the latest batch of inventors, visionaries, entrepreneurs, humanitarians and pioneers who are transforming the global landscape in everything from AI and solar, to gene editing and life-saving technology.

 

Here’s a quick snapshot of some of the top under-35 crowd, and how they’re shaking up the globe.

 

Inventors: Gene Berdichevsky

What’s the future of the battery? Gene Berdichevsky will keep us posted in his search for new materials and ways to improve upon the lithium-ion battery.

 

Entrepreneurs: Kathy Gong

Will China be the next emerging tech hub? It just might be if Kathy Gong has anything to say about it, as she develops new models for domestic entrepreneurship.

 

Visionaries: Greg Brockman

Elon Musk might be denouncing AI as our “biggest existential threat”; but Greg Brockman is working hard to make sure that AI will benefit humanity rather than undermine or destroy it.

 

Humanitarians – Suchi Saria

Big data is trending, and Suchi Saria is applying medical data to predict and prevent sepsis.

 

Pioneers – Jenna Wiens

Where would the world be without pioneers to break through the expected to fresh, new solutions? Jenna Wiens is exploring computational modelling as a way of identifying high-risk prospects of a dangerous infection spreading through hospitals.

 

Here’s to the next generation of leaders (35 and under) who are reshaping our world.

 

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Ad-tech, Mad-tech, Mar-tech https://www.techrevolution.asia/ad-tech-mad-tech-mar-tech/ https://www.techrevolution.asia/ad-tech-mad-tech-mar-tech/#respond Thu, 17 Aug 2017 06:00:36 +0000 https://www.techrevolution.asia/?p=13424 Ad-tech was on the rise until funding came to a halt. In light of big data and analysis trends, ad-tech has left funders and marketers looking for something more. But funding is alive and well for “mad-tech,” the new and expanded landscape that includes not only ad-tech but also mar-tech firms and marketing-data and analytics...

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Ad-tech was on the rise until funding came to a halt. In light of big data and analysis trends, ad-tech has left funders and marketers looking for something more.

But funding is alive and well for “mad-tech,” the new and expanded landscape that includes not only ad-tech but also mar-tech firms and marketing-data and analytics companies—with major emphases on marketing data, brand safety and future TV ads.  These 4 companies are shaking things up and launching marketing trends.

 

Beeswax

With $35 million of funding to date, the company provides a streamlined system for other companies to establish their own real-time ad-buying tech platform. The big benefit? Companies no longer have to build their own tech platforms.

 

Yieldbot

The $100 million-funded startup connects brands with prospective customers by tapping into consumer intent data. From store visits to specific purchases, the company helps marketers use buyer data to direct their ads right to where it counts.

 

Celtra

Automating the digital ad creative was difficult to achieve until Celtra came along. With $25 million in funding to date, the company is backed by Unilever and the people behind WPP.

 

iSpot TV

Big data and analytics come together to pinpoint and transform the way people view television. By tracking watching habits, ad delivery, and people’s interest levels, iSpot helps companies determine if their ad spend is generating ROI.

 

Mad-tech is going strong and helping new- and old-world marketers determine their returns on more traditional forms of marketing, as well as inbound strategies. By lessening the gap between outbound and inbound, mad-tech is revolutionising marketing as we’ve come to know it.

 

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7 benefits of hyper-convergence in data centres and how they help you adapt to the future https://www.techrevolution.asia/7-benefits-hyper-convergence-data-centres-help-adapt-future/ https://www.techrevolution.asia/7-benefits-hyper-convergence-data-centres-help-adapt-future/#respond Thu, 17 Aug 2017 03:42:26 +0000 https://www.techrevolution.asia/?p=11366 If you have a lot of different technologies and resources that you’re juggling through your IT work, it may be worth trying out a hyper-converged system. Here’s some information on the approach including some of the benefits of using this type of system going forward.   What Is Hyper-Convergence in the Context of Data Centres?...

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If you have a lot of different technologies and resources that you’re juggling through your IT work, it may be worth trying out a hyper-converged system. Here’s some information on the approach including some of the benefits of using this type of system going forward.

 

What Is Hyper-Convergence in the Context of Data Centres?

According to Tech Target hyper-convergence allows using your storage, networking resources, and virtualisation resources all together in tight alignment. Most data centres are going to have these resources and approaches filled up all separately. There are a number of advantages to using a hyper converging approach as opposed to the more traditional approach, related specifically to efficiency.

Making Things Simple

By putting everything into a single vendor including the implementing, operating and procuring parts of the situation, you ensure that fewer problems arise. An example of this sort of problem is when various vendors blame other vendors for some problem with your data centre. Making it so that it’s all done by a single vendor in a single package, this makes this less of an issue. It also means that it’s easier to see how all the different parts interact since they are all created to work that way with a singular approach.

Plus, it means that you don’t have to contact ten different vendors who will all deny that there’s a problem. If you have a problem, it will be from the one vendor, and you only have to call them. It also means that your point of contact is going to be singular throughout the entire life of the systems. This means that there’s a significant advantage over integrated systems where all of the different firmware updates have to converge properly inside multiple stacked devices. With a hyper-converged system in a data centre, instead, there’s only one upgrade at a time and no finagling with how the various parts interact.

Security

Protecting data is one of the most important aspects of any system in a data centre. This is a major downside in an old style integrated system because there’s so much complexity. So-called “legacy” systems mean that you are stuck with your decisions and new pieces that you may want to add later could add even more complexity as well as other difficulties into the system. This complexity is exactly what causes leaks in security that can lead to breaches. You have to worry about handling processes like recovering files, backing them up in the first place, and dealing with potential disaster in a complex way because of how the system works.

When it comes to hyper-converged systems, you can instead get all of these processes built right into the whole system which is singular anyway so that it will affect them all equally.

Making It Automatic

Another important aspect to note for how hyper-converged data centres give you an advantage is when it comes to using systems that work by themselves, or with minimal managing. For example, with a hyper-converged system, all the different parts of the system can often be controlled with a single tool set. This means that you can tweak everything the way you want it without having to open one different tool after another all on different systems which can take forever and lead to mistakes as people miss things after each changeover or just out of sheer frustration. One other advantage to this is that compatibility is less of an issue between automated systems.

Scaling Benefits

It’s easy to scale things when you’re focusing on hyper-convergence because everything is designed to work by way of blocks. You can expand the alibis of your virtualisation and other systems by just adding more blocks. Everything is designed to level up one level at a time, which also makes it so that you don’t have to invest a lot of money in each upgrade. A smaller upgrade cost also means that you’ll be able to start using what you add much faster as well.

 

What The Trend Means to Southeast Asia

There’s some evidence that shows that converged and even hyper-converged platforms are starting to garner interest in this particular area. The early stages of the trend started last year regarding laying the groundwork for infrastructures to make it happen. This means that it’s going to be a good time to get started and get ahead of the rest of the competition. Areas like Indonesia, Thailand and Singapore are already considering trying out this systematic approach to get their IT costs way down and make their processes far simpler and more streamlined.

This is also going to mean that people end up needing less training and you may need fewer employees to worry about it as well since everything is integrated into one relatively homogeneous system. All of the hardware for networking, computing, and storage are one-off components that are all put into a single area, so they will be easier to understand and work with. It also means that the components aren’t stuck to the foundational infrastructure underneath them, allowing for considerable flexibility.

According to Computer Weekly, the hyper-converged market will be up to nearly a quarter of the market by 2019, with a worth of around five billion US dollars. This means that this trend hitting the Asian market is only a matter of time since it’s likely to hit everywhere in the next few years. As a result, you’re going to end up with a particular advantage if you get into it now since the Asian market especially is still in its infancy and you’ll end up ahead of where everyone else is.

 

How This Trend Affects Senior IT Managers and Influencers

Obviously, staying on top of this trend is going to be important to those interested in the field because of the possible ability to lower overhead in IT departments and increase efficiency and accuracy in data centres. In particular, the benefit of making automated processes easier is important because it means that you don’t have to worry about making sure that different products from different manufacturers are all going to work together efficiently. Since it’s all one environment, your automation will function efficiently, and you can be sure of this.

Everything is getting smaller and more efficient with more ability for you to choose how it all works together and how it all can expand. This is going to be particularly important given the breakneck speed of technological change that’s expected to occur in the future. You need to be able to adapt to future conditions involving your data centre setup, and so having an adaptable system is going to be essential to making sure that you don’t get stuck with something that’s no longer relevant in the new reality that’s coming inevitably.

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Insights from an Asia Pacific COO – Part 2 My introduction to Japan: one COO’s view of a unique culture https://www.techrevolution.asia/insights-asia-pacific-coo-part-2-introduction-japan-one-coos-view-unique-culture/ https://www.techrevolution.asia/insights-asia-pacific-coo-part-2-introduction-japan-one-coos-view-unique-culture/#respond Wed, 16 Aug 2017 23:00:41 +0000 https://www.techrevolution.asia/?p=11410 This is the second of this short series of articles broadly grouped as “One COO’s guide to managing operations around a diverse region”. Part 1 is here. I am reasonably well travelled, but visited Japan for the first time only two years ago. I’d heard so much – how beautiful it is, how lovely the people...

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This is the second of this short series of articles broadly grouped as “One COO’s guide to managing operations around a diverse region”. Part 1 is here.

I am reasonably well travelled, but visited Japan for the first time only two years ago. I’d heard so much – how beautiful it is, how lovely the people are, how amazing the food is, and how unique doing business there is.

I was therefore delighted when my former boss, living in Japan at the time, invited me over for a visit. (Of course I later discovered an ulterior motive – he was buttering me up in a beautiful environment to tell me I was being moved out of my role in India. Clever!)

As it turns out, my manager is an Australian who is more Japanese than Australian. He speaks Japanese fluently, knows every fantastic restaurant in Tokyo, and represents in my mind how diverse and welcoming Tokyo is to multiple cultures, while at the same time remaining fiercely protective of its traditions and culture.

His humility is as good a lesson as you will ever need about leadership and the unpretentiousness of Japanese culture.

Captivated by the country and its people, here’s my take on what makes Japan so wonderful:

1.    The graciousness: Saying “thank you” (or “arigatou gozaimasu” to the uninitiated) to everyone for everything. I am not talking about the need to bow (to my surprise, not much of this takes place) but rather the humility and the good feeling this produces. I have been advised to say “thank you” to God but if you go by the adage that ‘God lives in every person’, saying “ thank you” to everyone seems like a very good thing to do. I imagine saying it often helps improve one’s metabolism, so I am trying it now in India. Many of my friends can’t quite understand why!

2.    The food: Clearly, eating a lot of raw food should be good for one’s health. The purity and freshness of nature seems to feature in much of Japanese cuisine. Even the rice I am told produces less carbs – especially when cooked in a $1,000 rice cooker, something I have yet to try! I have also learnt that a lot of wasabi on tuna reduces the fat content before it enters your digestive system! Net summary: enjoy traditional Japanese food as much as you want. Clearly, sushi and sashimi keeps the Japanese looking their best.

3.    The pieces of fruit: I was taken aback by the most amazingly sweet tomatoes, apples and oranges in Japan. Is it the soil, the nutrients, the specific varieties? All I know is, once you have tasted them, you will want to eat as many as you can afford. However, at $10 per piece of fruit, this might not be too many!

4.    The taxis: When in Japan, I am left wondering much of the time if I have hired a taxi or a private jet! Not in terms of speed (Japanese taxi drivers are just as polite as the entire country – a ‘polite taxi driver’ is not an oxymoron) but in cost. For the price of three trips between the airport and my hotel in Tokyo, I could buy a Tata Nano car in India! Little wonder then that the Japanese rarely take taxis, and prefer to use the metro system. I imagine the high cost of taxis helps keep the nation healthy, as more people travel by train and on foot.

5.    The specialty retail stores: A nine-floor large retailer offering just about anything you wish to buy with endless aisles, a seven-floor stationery store, a bar with nothing but tequila… you can spend literally hours just walking around, and once again, all that movement leads to greater physical fitness. You don’t even need to buy anything – where else in the world can you try $2,000 headphones in a shopping aisle! In many ways, Japan lights the path for bricks and mortar retailers to succeed in this online shopping world.

In summary, I believe the inner beauty of the country might simply inspire the prevalence of healthy bodies and minds. The way tradition and modernity coexists in Japan is really something special. I discovered so much just walking around Tokyo, and I am told some of the other cities are even more impressive. I’m certainly hoping my Japanese team gives me a reason to visit these places soon!

Please leave your thoughts and comments below or reach out to me on Twitter.

 

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Thinking the unthinkable https://www.techrevolution.asia/thinking-the-unthinkable/ https://www.techrevolution.asia/thinking-the-unthinkable/#respond Wed, 16 Aug 2017 06:00:44 +0000 https://www.techrevolution.asia/?p=13409 Written by: Mark Pesce What if an invisible attacker tried to bring down your business? Companies need to think about the unthinkable when it comes to cyber threats. We spend most of our lives blissfully unaware that one day we will cease. It’s too depressing – so we simply don’t think about the inevitable. That willful suppression of facts gives us...

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Written by: Mark Pesce

What if an invisible attacker tried to bring down your business? Companies need to think about the unthinkable when it comes to cyber threats.

We spend most of our lives blissfully unaware that one day we will cease. It’s too depressing – so we simply don’t think about the inevitable. That willful suppression of facts gives us some measure of peace. We don’t spend our days torn apart in existential crises. But it also leaves us with a false sense of permanence. We believe every day will be just like the next.

Until that’s no longer the case.

In her groundbreaking work, On Death and Dying, Elisabeth Kübler-Ross identified the psychological stages we pass through as we come to terms with our own mortality: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. Given the chance, before the end we all find a way to think about the unthinkable.

Listening to Carl Woerndle tell the horrific tale of the sudden and absolute destruction of Distribute.IT, you can actually hear him pass through each stage. It begins with disbelief – how can this be happening? Followed by anger – who is doing this? Next comes bargaining – perhaps we can make it through this. Then into depression – we’ll never get through this.  Finally there’s acceptance – the fire sale of the business as the best way to do right by Distribute.IT’s resellers.

The progression from denial to acceptance often takes many months. No-one should be forced through it in a span of three weeks. There’s just not enough time to process all of the trauma. But that’s just what happened to Carl.

As Carl makes clear, there’s nothing particularly special about his case nor any real reason why Distribute.IT was singled out for this attack. For Carl, this was as senseless as a car crash – out of the blue, and then everything changes.

Our first instinct may be to shudder and thank our lucky stars it happened to someone else. Yet, as Carl says, “It’s not a matter of if, but when.” Lightning will strike. Hackers will come. They will get in, they will maraud, and you will not be able to stop them.

We put great value on IT security because we want to believe that it can save us. It allows us to live with the unthinkable. Security vendors know this. They play on those insecurities, promising that vigilance – and a hefty payment – equals peace of mind.

But the threat of cyber attacks remains very real. The power of networks to enhance collaboration and productivity are equalled by the vulnerabilities they facilitate. These are two sides of the same coin.

It’s easy to have a secure IT infrastructure – if you air-gap every computer in your organisation. Sure, productivity will plummet – but at least you’ll be able to sleep at night.

Denial is not an answer. Nor anger, nor bargaining with security vendors for that magic talisman to hold the hackers at bay. Depression is not a strategy. The only way forward is acceptance.

Accept that all your network systems are vulnerable. Accept that they are constantly being probed, and that these probes are more successful than you will ever know. Accept that your business continues only on the sufferance of hackers who can’t be bothered to wipe the data off your drives.

Accept all of that as ground truth, and prepare.

If your entire IT infrastructure disappeared tomorrow – corrupted, hacked into uselessness – how long would it take to rebuild? How long before employees could get back to work?

How long before you could trade again? Would your business survive an extinction-level event?

Distribute.IT didn’t – even with a rescue plan in place, backups and a well-trained staff. Will your rescue plan survive an encounter with the enemy?

You need to find out.

Make it a priority to run the full fire drill: Starting from nothing, rebuild a workable IT infrastructure.  Do that, learn from your mistakes, improve the plan, and run the drill again, so that when the attack comes – and the attack will come – your organisation will be able to meet the challenge.

While planning your fire drill, take an inventory of the value of all of the data of all of your systems, and get that insured in full. Perhaps the biggest takeaway from Carl’s story is the mismatch between insurance and risk. That’s a fatal mistake in any business – but at least it’s one that can be remedied.

The world is a dangerous place and companies need to think about the unthinkable when it comes to cyber threats. Denying those dangers leaves us unprepared, granting those dangers a terrible power over us. Only in acceptance – and vigilant preparedness – can we rest assured that we’ve done our best.

 

Original article first appear here

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Why machine learning is the future of data mining https://www.techrevolution.asia/machine-learning-future-data-mining/ https://www.techrevolution.asia/machine-learning-future-data-mining/#respond Wed, 16 Aug 2017 02:56:03 +0000 https://www.techrevolution.asia/?p=11360 Big data has been the unavoidable buzzword of the Internet for the past few years, but it’s actually the fuel behind the next big thing: data mining using machine learning. The recent explosion of big data is what made data mining using machine learning possible. In fact, it’s now one of the most active areas...

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Big data has been the unavoidable buzzword of the Internet for the past few years, but it’s actually the fuel behind the next big thing: data mining using machine learning.

The recent explosion of big data is what made data mining using machine learning possible. In fact, it’s now one of the most active areas of predictive analysis. Machine-learning algorithms are the heart of various studies across industries, from mapping genomes to improving car safety.

So, what exactly is machine-learning? It’s basically algorithms constructed by researchers and data scientists that can learn from and make predictions based on data. Automated analysis provides organisations with fresh insights that were previously buried in the overload of data—opening the door for enhanced intelligent decision-making.

 

Turning big data into deep insights

Intel is one organisation that’s hopped on the machine-learning bandwagon with great success. Their business model operates around selling products, which may then be sold to another company as part of a broader service. Intel’s goal was to help their sales/ marketing teams identify the resellers that would best connect with customers in specific vertical industries: as in, the ones with the highest probability of generating sales.

Using data mining, the team developed a machine-learning system that doubled potential sales and increased engagement with resellers by 3x in certain industries. Intel’s tool also models web-browsing behaviour and can detect financial fraud.

Unleashing the power of machine-learning can help savvy businesses like Intel make data meaningful—and give them the competitive edge in our increasingly-connected world.

Read the original article here.

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